dyr #2 : Bobby’s Girl/Bobby’s in Deep

Some people say they don’t make ’em like they used to. Often times this is a grossly exaggerated lament to lost youth thinking that what is out today will always be inferior to your own great days of youth. And with anime, yes in some ways it is not like how it used to be. Gone are hand drawn cels, the old men from previous generations, the freshness of ideas or brands not being recycled and the use of longer drawn out stories particularly on television. But for one production, Bobby’s Girl, it will never be like it was, be it before or since.

BG4Bobby’s Girl could just be another OVA from 1985 and if you believe that you need to see this production again. Much like Angel’s Egg or Robot Carnival, Bobby’s Girl is an arthouse masterpiece of the era. But where the previous two are like fine art hanging in a gallery, Bobby’s Girl speaks to something more primal, raw and emotional. I can only attune it to a well played blues song. It’s a lament, a statement of feeling only the likes that a great musician can pour from his or her chosen instrument. You feel it in your soul and if you have a dry eye at the end, I have to question your humanity especially when the cover of the Marcie Blane song also named Bobby’s Girl plays over the end credits.

BG2The motorcycle has always been a symbol of rebellion. And why not, more often than not it is usually built for  one individual to ride. It becomes an extension of it’s rider and that rider can fly like the wind on only two wheels. Very similar to the lone anti-hero on a horse in a western. And Bobby (Akihito Nomura is his real name) is our lone anti-hero and his only only passion is riding motorcycles. He does not get along with his family, his father in particular is very hard on him being a bit of a “slacker”. But instead of being a cocked and loaded loudmouth Bobby is very aloof. His only drive is to just follow his interest, which he does to the chagrin of his family leading him to being kicked out of his home. Thus, he is left to fend for his own survival. Also highlighted in the story is an article from a magazine that featured our protagonist. He receives letters because of this article from a certain young lady who has a keen attraction towards him. Our hero has a fan, an admirer, maybe a potential love interest who likes him for him. But as a “freebird” does he really realize that he has someone who is watching out for him?

BG3The story is only one element of this production. The artwork, on the other hand, can almost be seen as the true star.  Mishmashing brief moments of teenage culture that can be seen in American Graffiti with the Pop Art movement of Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein, or high quality pencil sketches, into the current culture of 1980s Japan. Not that the entire production is experimental, it is those moments that break from the usual that make it special. This experimental nature makes this one of the many productions that can be considered an animators playhouse and a part of a handful of unique productions of the era that I stated before. Madhouse has always created quality work, but this one… wow. Thank you all for something beautiful.

This is one that is not very easy to come across, nor is it mentioned much in conversation. You have to track down this one, but unfortunately the only source I have found has video quality that is a little subpar. But like Citizen Kane on VHS vs. a generic big budget popcorn flick on 4K/HDR/Bluray/Hi-hi-hi definition, which is the better movie or experience? Quality always shines through limitation, but will you give it a try?

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